Polyurethane: Stable Cell Phenotype Requires Plasticity: Polymer Supported Directed Differentiation Reveals a Unique Gene Signature Predicting Stable Hepatocyte Performance (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2015)

Baltasar Lucendo Villarin, Kate Cameron, Dagmara Szkolnicka, Hassan Rashidi, Nicola Bates, Susan J Kimber, Oliver Flint, Stuart J Forbes, John P Iredale, Mark Bradley, David C Hay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

One major obstacle to the routine deployment of stem cell-derived cells is their instability in culture. On page 1820 David C. Hay and co-workers describe the use of a synthetic polymer surface. The image shows stem cell-derived hepatocytes replated on this polyurethane surface. Importantly the cells express Zonal Occludin (green stain) at the cell surface, which indicates that the cells display elements of polarization. The blue stain is DAPI, which demarks the nucleus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1819
JournalAdvanced Healthcare Materials
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2015

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