Porcine circovirus type 2 infection decreases the efficacy of a modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine

T. Opriessnig, K.L. Harmon, P.G. Halbur, N.E. McKeown, X.J. Meng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-induced pneumonia is a major problem, and vaccination is used to reduce losses associated with PRRSV. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes lymphoid depletion, and there is concern that this adversely affects the immune response. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of PCV2 infection on the efficacy of modified live virus (MLV) PRRSV vaccine. Sixty-nine 2-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to one of seven groups of 9 to 10 pigs each. At 6 weeks of age, pigs in groups 4, 5, and 6 were inoculated intranasally with PCV2 ISU-40895. At 8 weeks of age, groups 3, 4, 6, and 7 were vaccinated with a PRRSV MLV vaccine. At 12 weeks of age, groups 2, 3, and 4 were challenged with PRRSV SDSU73. All pigs were necropsied 14 days after PRRSV challenge. PCV2-infected, PRRSV-vaccinated, and PRRSV-challenged pigs had significantly (P <0.05) more-severe macroscopic lung lesions than did the PRRSV-vaccinated and PRRSV-challenged pigs that were not exposed to PCV2 prior to PRRSV vaccination. Nonvaccinated PRRSV-infected pigs had a significantly (P <0.001) higher incidence of PRRSV antigen in lungs than did all other groups except the group infected with PCV2 prior to PRRSV vaccination and challenge. The nonvaccinated PRRSV-challenged group and the group challenged with PCV2 prior to PRRSV vaccination and challenge had significantly (P <0.001) lower average daily weight gain than did the control and the vaccinated groups. This work suggests that PCV2 infection has an adverse effect on the development of protective immunity induced by PRRSV vaccine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)923-929
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2006

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