Power, Patronage and Memory in Early Islam: Perspectives on Umayyad Elites

Alain George (Editor), Andrew Marsham (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

The Umayyads, the first Islamic dynasty, ruled over the largest empire that the world had seen, stretching from Spain in the west to the Indus Valley and Central Asia in the east. They played a crucial rule in the articulation of the new religion of Islam during the seventh and eighth centuries, shaping its public face, artistic expressions, and the state apparatus that sustained it. The present volume brings together a collection of essays that bring new light to this crucial period of world history, with a focus on the ways in which Umayyad elites fashioned and projected their image and how these articulations, in turn, mirrored their times. These themes are approached through a wide variety of sources, from texts through art and archaeology to architecture, with new considerations of old questions and fresh material evidence that make the intersections and resonances between different fields of historical study come alive.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherOxford University Press
Number of pages368
ISBN (Print)9780190498931
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • early Islam
  • Umayyads
  • Caliphate
  • Damascus
  • Jerusalem
  • Syria
  • Iraq
  • Islamic art
  • Islamic history
  • historiography

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Power, Patronage and Memory in Early Islam: Perspectives on Umayyad Elites'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.
  • Paradise or empire? On a paradox of Umayyad art

    George, A., 8 Feb 2018, Power, Patronage and Memory in Early Islam: Perspectives on Umayyad Elites. George, A. & Marsham, A. (eds.). Oxford University Press, p. 40-68

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cite this