Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP) Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice

James P. Sheppard*, Richard Stevens, Paramjit Gill, Una Martin, Marshall Godwin, Janet Hanley, Carl Heneghan, F. D. Richard Hobbs, Jonathan Mant, Brian McKinstry, Martin Myers, David Nunan, Alison Ward, Bryan Williams, Richard J. McManus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/ home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/ home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home-clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the homeclinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/ home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48-0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85-0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient's blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient's ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)941-950
Number of pages10
JournalHypertension
Volume67
Issue number5
Early online date21 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

Keywords

  • ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • hypertension
  • masked hypertension
  • white coat hypertension
  • SERUM URIC-ACID
  • LIFE-STYLE INTERVENTIONS
  • ESSENTIAL-HYPERTENSION
  • INDEPENDENT MECHANISM
  • OBESITY
  • HYPERURICEMIA
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • CHILDHOOD
  • ATHEROSCLEROSIS
  • DISEASE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP) Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this