Presentation of paper: VISIONS OF THE BEAST: Animal Imagery in Illustration.

Jonathan Gibbs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Illustration & Writing: Visual Languages. The 2nd International Illustration Research Symposium, Manchester Met. University, November 3-4 2011.

Presentation of paper by Jonathan Gibbs: VISIONS OF THE BEAST: Animal Imagery in Illustration.

This Symposium brought together academics and practising artists, writers, and designers in exploring Text and Image in their relationship to Illustration; both in research and practice. Various speakers addressed issues of form and content, intention and audience. My own contribution used examples of book and editorial illustration by staff and students at Edinburgh College of Art, depicting animal imagery in various modes of narrative illustration. I referred to historical figures: Albrecht Durer, William Blake and Thomas Bewick, to show the naturalistic and symbolic representation of animals in art. I related these to contemporary examples included published work by Catherine Rayner, Tom Gauld, Holly Surplice, Sara Ogilvie, and others.
All of these artists have developed a narrative approach to animal-based themes, to a high degree of visual expression. This is allied to the academic content of courses at ECA, and staff research subjects. My own examples included illustrations for Edward Lear, the Edinburgh Book Festival. These illustrations take a more abstracted and symbolic approach, which has been applied in various contexts to tell a story. I spoke about the visual interpretations of existing text, as well as authorial illustration practice.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIllustration & Writing: Visual Languages. The 2nd International Illustration Research Symposium
Place of PublicationManchester
PublisherManchester Met University
Publication statusPublished - 3 Nov 2011

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