Prevalence and characteristics associated with diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose among people aged 15 to 64 years in rural and urban Rwanda: secondary data analysis of World Health Organization surveillance data

Charlotte Munganyinka Bavuma, Jean Berchmans Niyibizi, Leopold Bitunguhari, Sanctus Musafiri, Ruth McQuillan, Sarah Wild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Introduction: diabetes mellitus is an increasing public health burden in developing countries. The magnitude of diabetes association with traditional risk factors for diabetes have been given less attention in rural population. This study aims to determine the prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose and to assess associated characteristics to hyperglycemia in rural and urban Rwanda.

Methods: this is a secondary analysis of data from a population-based cross-sectional study of 7240 people describing risk factors for non-communicable diseases using the WHO stepwise methods (STEPS). Relative frequencies of variables of interest were compared in rural and urban residence using Pearson chi-square tests. Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose were combined in a single hyperglycemia variable and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to explore associations between hyperglycemia, socio-demographic and health factors in urban and rural populations.

Results: the prevalence in rural and urban areas was 7.5% and 9.7% (p.005) for diabetes and 5.0% and 6.2% for impaired fasting glucose (p.079) respectively. Obesity (AOR 2.57: CI: 0.86-7.9), high total cholesterol (AOR 3.83: CI: 2.03-7.208), hypertension (AOR 1.18: CI: 0.69-2.00), increasing age were associated with hyperglycemia in urban participants but only high total cholesterol and low high density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol were risk factors for hyperglycemia in rural participants.

Conclusion: approximately one in six people in Rwanda have hyperglycemia. The magnitude of the association with traditional risk factors for diabetes differ in rural and urban settings. Different approaches to primary and secondary prevention of diabetes may be needed in rural populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number115
Pages (from-to)115
JournalPan African Medical Journal
Volume41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2022

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Cholesterol
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Data Analysis
  • Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
  • Fasting
  • Glucose
  • Humans
  • Hyperglycemia/epidemiology
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • Rural Population
  • Rwanda/epidemiology
  • Urban Population
  • World Health Organization

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