Progress of GP Clusters two years after their introduction in Scotland: findings from the Scottish School of Primary Care National GP Survey

Stewart Mercer, John Gillies, Bridie Fitzpartick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Background GP Clusters commenced across Scotland in 2016 to improve the quality of care of local populations Aim To determine GPs views on GP clusters, and the robustness of bespoke questions Design & setting Cross-sectional national survey of work satisfaction of GPs working in Scotland, conducted in the latter half of 2018 Method Analysis of bespoke questions on GP Clusters completed by a) Quality Leads (QLs), and b) all other GPs in a nationally representative sample of GPs. Results QLs reported that Clusters were meeting regularly and were friendly and well organised but not always productive. Support for cluster activity (data, health intelligence, analysis, quality improvement methods, advice, leadership, and evaluation) was sub-optimal. Factor analysis identified two separate constructs (cluster meetings and cluster support), which were minimally influenced (<2%) by GP and practice characteristics. Non-Quality Leads (75% of all GPs) were generally satisfied with the two-way communication with the cluster quality leads, but the great majority (> 70%) reported no positive changes in various aspects of quality improvement. Factor analysis of these items indicated two constructs (cluster communication and cluster quality improvement) which were minimally affected by GP and practice characteristics. Conclusion GP Clusters are ‘up and running’ in Scotland but are at an early stage in terms of perceived impact, and appear to be in need of more support in order to improve quality of care. The bespoke questions developed on clusters have robust construct validity, suitable for future surveys.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice Open (BJGP Open)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Nov 2020

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