Protective adaptive immunity to Chlamydophila abortus infection and control of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA)

Mara S Rocchi, Sean Wattegedera, Ilaria Meridiani, Gary Entrican

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) remains a major problem in sheep-rearing countries despite the availability of protective vaccines. The causative agent, Chlamydophila abortus, is a Gram-negative bacterium that can induce a persistent, subclinical infection in non-pregnant sheep. The development of a new safe, effective and practical vaccine requires a detailed understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the identification of clear correlates of protection. Since disease (abortion) is only observed during pregnancy, the nature of host immunity to C. abortus and the specialised immunological features that permit maternal acceptance of the semi-allogeneic fetus are central to the pathogenesis of OEA. We review the current literature on persistence of C. abortus, host immunity to infection and mechanisms of abortion. We identify the key outstanding questions surrounding OEA and discuss the current knowledge gaps with a view to developing improved control strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-21
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume135
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2009

Keywords

  • Abortion, Veterinary
  • Animals
  • Chlamydophila
  • Chlamydophila Infections
  • Female
  • Pregnancy
  • Sheep
  • Sheep Diseases

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