Provision of online normalising information to reduce stigma associated with psychosis: Can an audio podcast challenge negative appraisals of psychotic experiences?

Paul French, Paul Hutton, Sarah Barratt, Rory Byrne, Sophie Parker, Nick Shryane, Anthony P Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cognitive models of psychosis suggest that challenging negative appraisals of psychotic experiences could directly reduce associated distress and stigma. A pilot study investigating whether online normalising information in the form of an audio podcast could challenge negative appraisals of psychotic experiences in the general population was conducted. Within‐subject change in negative appraisals of psychotic experiences and knowledge of prevalence of psychotic experiences were evaluated using pre‐ and post‐podcast self‐report questionnaires. One hundred and forty‐six people provided partial or full responses to a pre‐podcast assessment, and 49% returned to complete follow‐up measures. There was a significant reduction in participants' scores on measures of negative appraisals of auditory hallucinations and paranoia, a significant increase in their scores on a measure of normalising beliefs about paranoia and a significant increase in their estimates of the prevalence of psychotic experiences. The results of this pilot study are encouraging, but further research is required to evaluate this approach.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-62
JournalPsychosis
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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