Putting mobility theory to work: Conceptualizing employment-related geographical mobility

Tim Cresswell*, Sara Dorow, Sharon Roseman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although the mobility turn has captured the critical imaginations of researchers studying an array of topics, its possible contributions to analyses of the spectrum of employment-related geographical mobility have only begun to be defined. Studies of work have engaged with the growing body of mobility theory in limited ways; by the same token, mobilities studies have taken a somewhat narrow and sometimes uncritical view of work, labor, and employment. This article draws on a major interdisciplinary research project into the socio-historical patterns, contexts, and impacts of employment-related geographical mobility in Canada to build a conceptual bridge between these two literatures. We re-visit established bodies of work on migration, work, and political economy and look at new avenues for conceptualizing employment-related geographical mobility. We then examine a case study from the Alberta Oil Sands and suggest an agenda for future research on mobility and work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1787-1803
Number of pages17
JournalEnvironment and Planning
Volume48
Issue number9
Early online date17 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • labor
  • work
  • Canada
  • employment-related geographic mobility
  • MIGRATION
  • TRANSPORT
  • GENDER
  • STRATEGIES
  • BUSINESS
  • HEALTH
  • TRAVEL
  • SPACE
  • WOMEN
  • POWER

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