Quantitative imaging biomarkers in neuro-oncology

National Cancer Research Institute Brain Tumour Imaging Subgroup, Adam D Waldman, Alan Jackson, Stephen J Price, Christopher A Clark, Thomas C Booth, Dorothee P Auer, Paul S Tofts, David J Collins, Martin O Leach, Jeremy H Rees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Conventional structural imaging provides limited information on tumor characterization and prognosis. Advances in neurosurgical techniques, radiotherapy planning and novel drug treatments for brain tumors have generated increasing need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. This Review considers the role of physiological MRI and PET molecular imaging in understanding metabolic processes associated with tumor growth, blood flow and ultrastructure. We address the utility of various techniques in distinguishing between tumors and non-neoplastic processes, in tumor grading, in defining anatomical relationships between tumor and eloquent brain regions and in determining the biological substrates of treatment response. Much of the evidence is derived from limited case series in individual centers. Despite their 'added value', the effect of these techniques as an adjunct to structural imaging in clinical research and practice remains limited.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-54
Number of pages10
JournalNature Reviews Clinical Oncology
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Keywords

  • Antineoplastic Agents
  • Biomarkers
  • Blood Volume
  • Brain Chemistry
  • Brain Diseases
  • Brain Neoplasms
  • Cerebrovascular Circulation
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Drug Delivery Systems
  • Glioma
  • Hemoglobins
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Neovascularization, Pathologic
  • Neurosurgical Procedures
  • Oxygen
  • Planning Techniques
  • Positron-Emission Tomography
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Journal Article
  • Review

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