Quantitative trait loci and genes associated with salmonid alphavirus load in Atlantic salmon: implications for pancreas disease resistance and tolerance

M L Aslam, D Robledo, A Krasnov, H K Moghadam, B Hillestad, R D Houston, M Baranski, S Boison, N A Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Salmonid alphavirus infection results in pancreas disease causing severe economic losses for Atlantic salmon aquaculture. Knowledge about genes and pathways contributing to resistance is limited. A 54 K SNP panel was used to genotype 10 full-sibling families each consisting of ~ 110 offspring challenged with salmonid alphavirus subtype 3. Relative heart viral load was assessed at 4- and 10-weeks post-infection using quantitative PCR. A moderate genomic heritability of viral load at 4 weeks (0.15-0.21) and a high positive correlation with survival (0.91-0.98) were detected. Positions of QTL detected on chromosome 3 matched those for survival detected by other studies. The SNP of highest significance occurred in the 3' untranslated region of gig1, a fish-specific antiviral effector. Locus B of immunoglobulin heavy chain mapped to an area containing multiple SNPs with genome-wide association. Heart mRNA-seq comparing parr from families with high- versus low-genomic breeding value, and matching sample genotypes for SNPs, identified two eQTL for salmonid alphavirus load. Immune genes associated with trans-eQTL were numerous and spread throughout the genome. QTL regions contained several genes with known or predicted immune functions, some differentially expressed. The putative functional genes and variants identified could help improve marker-based selection for pancreas disease resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10393
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2020

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