Researching secret spaces: A reflexive account on negotiating risk and academic integrity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This article uses the case study of the Commission for International Justice and Accountability (CIJA) and its work on Syria as a way to reflect on the challenges international lawyers face in conducting research in relation to secret, highly constrained spaces. In particular, the article engages with debates within anthropology on the nature of paraethnographic research as a way to think about research relationships between international legal scholars and practitioners as conducive of collaboration, (inter)dependency and dialogue. Yet this type of research, especially without the grounding of legal texts, raises questions about the legal researcher’s integrity and author(ity). Thus, the article’s core concern is to explore the inter-relationship between a variety of risks that can occur for both scholars and research subjects operating in secret spaces.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-287
Number of pages19
JournalLeiden Journal of International Law
Volume33
Issue number2
Early online date10 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2020

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • methodology
  • para-ethnography
  • Commission for International Justice and Accountability (CIJA)
  • anthropology
  • secrecy
  • international law

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