Redimensionner la fonction publique au Malawi: Préceptes des organisations internationales et réalités administratives

Translated title of the contribution: Resizing the civil service in Malawi: Precepts of international organizations and administrative realities

Gerhard Anders*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The reduction in the number of government employees is the direct consequence of programs devised by IFI (international financial institution) experts aiming to reorganize the public sector according to World Bank and IMF guidelines. However, far from altering the underlying dynamics and structures of the civil service, the reforms undertaken have reinforced cleavages inherited from the colonial period and heightened tensions. The process of reorganizing the civil service in Malawi is a case the prompts one to question the relevance of the instrumental view of good governance touted by the IFI, a vision based on a decontextualized and a historic concept of a "dysfunctional" state that can be "repaired" using the "tools" proposed by experts. For it indeed seems that even when IFI objectives have been met, public sector reform, which primarily aims to orient transformations in Malawi in a direction favored by the "donor community," has not at all helped to make the bureaucracy more efficient. It is on the contrary more fragmented than ever. "Enclaves" enjoy IFI financial and logistic support and supervising ministries fight for the meager resources, while "juniors," the many subordinate civil servants in the country's administration, are increasingly taking their distance from their "bosses".
Translated title of the contributionResizing the civil service in Malawi: Precepts of international organizations and administrative realities
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)85-99
Number of pages15
JournalCritique Internationale
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jan 2007

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