Resting energy expenditure measured longitudinally following hip fracture compared to predictive equations: is an injury adjustment required?

Michelle D Miller, Lynne A Daniels, Elaine Bannerman, Maria Crotty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study measuring resting energy expenditure (REE; kJ/d) longitudinally using indirect calorimetry in six elderly women aged > or =70 years following surgery for hip fracture, describes changes over time (days 10, 42 and 84 post-injury) and compares measured values to those calculated from routinely applied predictive equations. REE was compared to REE predicted using the Harris Benedict and Schofield equations, with and without accounting for the theoretical increase in energy expenditure of 35 % secondary to physiological stress of injury and surgery. Mean (95 % CI) measured REE (kJ/d) was 4704 (4354, 5054), 4090 (3719, 4461) and 4145 (3908, 4382) for days 10, 42 and 84, respectively. A time effect was observed for measured REE, P=0.003. Without adjusting for stress the mean difference and 95 % limits of agreement for measured and predicted REE (kJ/kg per d) for the Harris Benedict equation were 1 (-9, 12), 10 (2, 18) and 9 (1, 17) for days 10, 42 and 84, respectively. The mean difference and 95 % limits of agreement for measured and predicted REE (kJ/kg per d) for the Schofield equation without adjusting for stress were 8 (-3, 19), 16 (6, 26) and 16 (10, 22) for days 10, 42 and 84, respectively. After adjusting for stress, REE predicted from the Harris Benedict or Schofield equations overestimated measured REE by between 38 and 69 %. Energy expenditure following fracture is poorly understood. Our data suggest REE was relatively elevated early in recovery but declined during the first 6 weeks. Using the Harris Benedict or Schofield equations adjusted for stress may lead to overestimation of REE in the clinical setting. Further work is required to evaluate total energy expenditure before recommendations can be made to alter current practice for calculating theoretical total energy requirements of hip fracture patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)976-82
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Basal Metabolism/physiology
  • Body Weight/physiology
  • Calorimetry, Indirect/methods
  • Female
  • Hip Fractures/metabolism
  • Humans
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Nutritional Status/physiology
  • Postoperative Period
  • Rest
  • Stress, Physiological/physiopathology
  • Time Factors

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