Reverse causation in activity-cognitive ability associations: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

Alan J Gow, Janie Corley, John Starr, Ian J Deary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Active lifestyles might protect cognitive abilities; however, studies rarely consider the reverse causal direction. Activity-cognition associations might reflect stable intelligence differences rather than a protective effect of activity. The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (n = 1091) completed cognitive tests aged 70, having taken an intelligence test aged 11. Activity (assessed by participation in 15 activities that produced a socio-intellectual activity factor, and by physical activity) was positively associated with cognition (r = .08 to .32, p ≤ .05). When age-11 IQ and adult social class were controlled, only physical activity remained significantly associated with general cognitive ability and processing speed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-255
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume27
Early online date6 Jun 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reverse causation in activity-cognitive ability associations: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this