Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

Rob w. Van Nues, Daniel Castro-roa, Yulia Yuzenkova, Nikolay Zenkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2577-2592
JournalNucleic Acids Research
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2016

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