Role of detrusor PDGFRα+ cells in mouse model of cyclophosphamide-induced detrusor overactivity

Haeyeong Lee, Byoung H Koh, Lauren E Peri, Holly J Woodward, Brian A Perrino, Kenton M Sanders, Sang Don Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis is a rodent model that shares many features common to the cystitis occurring in patients, including detrusor overactivity (DO). Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha positive (PDGFRα+) cells have been proposed to regulate muscle excitability in murine bladders during filling. PDGFRα+ cells express small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (predominantly SK3) that provide stabilization of membrane potential during filling. We hypothesized that down-regulation of the regulatory functions of PDGFRα+ cells and/or loss of PDGFRα+ cells generates the DO in CYP-treated mice. After CYP treatment, transcripts of Pdgfrα and Kcnn3 and PDGFRα and SK3 protein were reduced in detrusor muscle extracts. The distribution of PDGFRα+ cells was also reduced. Inflammatory markers were increased in CYP-treated detrusor muscles. An SK channel agonist, CyPPA, increased outward current and hyperpolarization in PDGFRα+ cells. This response was significantly depressed in PDGFRα+ cells from CYP-treated bladders. Contractile experiments and ex vivo cystometry showed increased spontaneous contractions and transient contractions, respectively in CYP-treated bladders with a reduction of apamin sensitivity, that could be attributable to the reduction in the SK conductance expressed by PDGFRα+ cells. In summary, PDGFRα+ cells were reduced and the SK3 conductance was downregulated in CYP-treated bladders. These changes are consistent with the development of DO after CYP treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5071
JournalScientific Reports
Volume12
Issue number1
Early online date24 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2022

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