Scotland's Rural Home: Nine Stories about Contemporary Architecture

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Rural Scotland is a charged landscape, alive with history, soaked in myth and often rather sublime. For those of us living an urban existence, the countryside is a retreat for refuge and decompression, but it is also a place where infrastructures strain to reach and in which livings must be made. The countryside is resistant to easy explanation and is thus vulnerable to stereotyping. The nine building stories told in this book show how rural households and communities define themselves, and the role architecture plays in this.

Illustrated with beautiful photography and drawings, the projects, from affordable housing on the islands to exquisite renovations of traditional agricultural stock, and all recognised by the Saltire Society’s Housing Design Awards, are visually rich both in themselves and the contexts in which they sit. The houses are set firmly within historic, economic and social contexts and are much more than bolt holes from the urban. Some of our buildings are active participants in rural regeneration and others reflect, in a profound way, what authenticity really means in the countryside. Like architecture everywhere, they present a mirror to a society’s preoccupations and values. However, this is a book too about architecture’s capacity to inspire and endlessly delight.

The output of a project funded by the Saltire Society and Scottish Government. A monograph that documents the process of selecting nine exemplar buildings and neighbourhoods in rural locations that have been recipients of the Saltire Prize for Housing. The buildings explore a distinctive relationship between design and rural development.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherLund Humphries
Commissioning bodyThe Saltire Society
Number of pages224
ISBN (Print)9781848224476
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2021

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