Self-compassion and depressive symptoms in chronic pain (CP): A 1-year longitudinal study

Sérgio A Carvalho, Inês A Trindade, David Gillanders, José Pinto-Gouveia, Paula Castilho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Self-compassion is associated with less depressive symptoms, better mental health outcomes, and less disability in Chronic Pain (CP). However, it remains longitudinally unexplored the role of self-compassion in CP. Also, although it is acknowledged the conceptual overlapping between mindfulness and self-compassion, few studies have explored the role of self-compassion in CP while controlling for mindfulness in a longitudinal design.

Methods: The current study conducts correlational and hierarchical linear regression analyses in a sample of 86 women with CP who completed an online battery of questionnaires that assess pain intensity, functional impairment, depressive symptoms, mindfulness and self-compassion in three time points: baseline (T0), 6-months (T1) and 12-months (T2).

Results: Results show that self-compassion (but not mindfulness) significantly predicts depressive symptoms at T1 and at T2 above and beyond depressive symptoms and functional impairment. Also, the interaction between functional impairment and and self-compassion at T0 significantly predicts depressive symptoms at T1, but not at T2.

Conclusions: These findings expand the current knowledge on the role of self-compassion in CP in showing that self-compassion is a significant predictor of later depressive symptoms in CP, and suggesting its potential role in buffering the impact of functional impairment in future levels of depressive symptoms.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalMindfulness
Early online date19 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • self-compassion
  • mindfulness
  • depression
  • longitudinal design

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