Self-reported tolerance of the intensity of exercise influences affective responses to and intentions to engage with high-intensity interval exercise

Claire Bradley, Ailsa Niven, Shaun Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of self-reported tolerance of the intensity of exercise on affective responses to, self-efficacy for and intention to repeat low-volume high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE). Thirty-six healthy participants (mean age 21 ± 2 years) were split into high tolerance (HT; n = 19), low tolerance (LT; n = 9), and very low tolerance (VLT; n = 8) of exercise intensity groups. Participants completed 10 x 6 s cycle sprints with 60 s recovery. Affective valence and perceived activation were measured before exercise, after sprints 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 min post-HIIE. Intention and self-efficacy were assessed 20 min post-HIIE. Affective valence was significantly lower in VLT vs. LT (P = 0.034, d = 1.01-1.14) and HT (P = 0.018, d = 1.34-1.70). Circumplex profiles showed a negative affective state in VLT only. The VLT group had lower intentions to repeat HIIE once and three times per week than HT (P < 0.001, d = 1.87 and 1.81, respectively) and LT (P = 0.107, d = 0.85; P = 0.295, d = 0.53, respectively). Self-efficacy was not influenced by tolerance. Self-reported tolerance of exercise intensity influences affective responses to and intentions to engage with HIIE.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1472-1480
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume37
Issue number13
Early online date29 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • interval training
  • intermittent training
  • adherence
  • psychological responses

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Self-reported tolerance of the intensity of exercise influences affective responses to and intentions to engage with high-intensity interval exercise'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this