Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine reveals conservation of its tissue distribution between amphibians and mammals

Rimple D. Almeida, Virginie Sottile, Matthew Loose, Paul A. De Sousa, Andrew D. Johnson, Alexey Ruzov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

5-Hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) is a form of modified cytosine, which has recently attracted a considerable attention due to its potential role in transcriptional regulation. According to several reports 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine distribution is tissue-specific in mammals. Thus, 5-hmC is enriched in embryonic cell populations and in adult neuronal tissue. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hmC and utilize it to assess the levels of this modification in amphibian tissues. We show that, similar to mammalian embryos, 5-hmC is enriched in axolotl tadpoles compared with adult tissues. Our data demonstrate that 5-hmC distribution is tissue-specific in amphibians, and that strong 5-hmC enrichment in neuronal cells is conserved between amphibians and mammals. In addition, we identify 5-hmC-enriched cell populations that are distributed in amphibian skin and connective tissue in a mosaic manner. Our results illustrate that immunochemistry can be successfully used not only for spatial identification of cells enriched with 5-hmC, but also for the semi-quantitative assessment of the levels of this epigenetic modification in single cells of different tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-140
Number of pages4
JournalEpigenetics
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine
  • regeneration
  • 5-HYDROXYMETHYLCYTOSINE
  • epigenetics
  • DNA
  • semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry
  • CONVERSION
  • 5-methyl-cytosine
  • evolution

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