Serum lipids and lipoproteins in equine colic and grass sickness

E M Milne, D L Doxey, J S Gilmour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Serum total lipids, lipoprotein fractions, triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids and free fatty acids were measured in horses with acute, subacute and chronic grass sickness (equine dysautonomia) and in colic cases. The values were compared with those of normal grazing and stabled horses. A marked individual variation occurred, but total lipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids were significantly higher than normal in grass sickness and colic cases with cholesterol was significantly higher than normal in grass sickness cases only. Pre-beta lipoprotein was significantly increased in colic and subacute grass sickness although all abnormal groups showed this fraction which was absent from normal horses. The percentage of alpha 2b lipoprotein was significantly higher in colic and grass sickness. The changes described are typical of those occurring in fat mobilisation in the horse and are considered to be due to a number of factors including decreased food intake, cortisol and catecholamine release and insulin resistance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-4
Number of pages5
JournalResearch in Veterinary Science
Volume48
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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