Sheep helminth parasitic disease in south eastern Scotland arising as a possible consequence of climate change

F. Kenyon, N. D. Sargison, P. J. Skuce, F. Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The climate in the UK is changing, with a trend towards increased rainfall in the autumn and winter and warmer average temperatures throughout the year. There has also been a 4-week extension of the herbage growing season over the past 40 years. These changes may have implications for the epidemiology of sheep helminth parasites. Here, we describe production-limiting disease outbreaks caused by Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus battus, Teladorsagia circumcincta and Fasciola hepatica in sheep flocks in south eastern Scotland. The occurrence and timing of these disease outbreaks could not have been predicted in this region highlighting changes in the epidemiology of helminth infections from the patterns historically described. These cases are used to introduce discussion regarding the potential effects of climate change on the epidemiology of helminth parasites and the implications for sheep farming in the UK. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-297
Number of pages5
JournalVeterinary Parasitology
Volume163
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Aug 2009

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