Size counts: The significance of size, font and style of print for readers with low vision sitting examinations

Marianna Buultjens, Stuart Aitken, John Ravenscroft, Kevin Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This Paper is based on a study commissioned by the Royal National Institute for the Blind (Aitken, S., Ravenscroft, J., Buultjens, M. & Carey, K., 1998)1which examined the effects of font, size and styles of print for students with low vision undertaking examinations such as GCSE, A Levels and Highers in the UK. It confirmed the importance of individualisation in these matters and identified that font, size and style affect speed and accuracy. The study raised important issues for those presenting students for examinations and for examination boards with respect to adapting and modifying print papers. Helvetica N24 plain text emerged as the most generally accessible font, size and style.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-10
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Visual Impairment
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1999

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