“Sluts” and “Slaves”: The Internet and the Evolution of Fantasy in Dennis Cooper's Online Work

Jaime García-Iglesias*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This article explores a yet unresearched part of Dennis Cooper’s production: his blog posts and, in particular, his “Sluts” and “Slaves” monthly posts, where he compiles explicit and sometimes sordid texts and images of gay sex workers apparently found online. First, this paper will situate these blog posts in the fields of citational and online literature, arguing that they are an example of ‘flarf’. In so doing, it also extends the notion of “flarf” from poetry to narrative. Then, this paper explores the continuities and differences between the blog posts and Cooper’s other work, most notably The Sluts (2005), to argue that —while similar in their focus on the internet and “the impossibility of truth”— the blog posts present a significant transformation that compels readers to confront their own desires.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-103
Number of pages19
JournalMiscelanea
Volume68
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2023

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Cooper
  • desire
  • digital literature
  • fantasy
  • flarf
  • found language

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '“Sluts” and “Slaves”: The Internet and the Evolution of Fantasy in Dennis Cooper's Online Work'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this