Small and Large Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Visible Perivascular Spaces in the Basal Ganglia of Parkinson's Disease Patients

Joel Ramirez*, Stephanie A. Berberian, David P. Breen, Fuqiang Gao, Miracle Ozzoude, Sabrina Adamo, Christopher J. M. Scott, Courtney Berezuk, Vanessa Yhap, Tiago A. Mestre, Connie Marras, Maria C. Tartaglia, David Grimes, Mandar Jog, Donna Kwan, Brian Tan, Malcolm A. Binns, Stephen R. Arnott, Robert Bartha, Sean SymonsMario Masellis, Sandra E. Black, Anthony E. Lang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Background: Although previously thought to be asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested that magnetic resonance imaging–visible perivascular spaces (PVS) in the basal ganglia (BG-PVS) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may be markers of motor disability and cognitive decline. In addition, a pathogenic and risk profile difference between small (≤3-mm diameter) and large (>3-mm diameter) PVS has been suggested. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine associations between quantitative measures of large and small BG-PVS, global cognition, and motor/nonmotor features in a multicenter cohort of patients with PD. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study examining the association between large and small BG-PVS with Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Parts I–IV and cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) in 133 patients with PD enrolled in the Ontario Neurodegenerative Disease Research Initiative study. Results: Patients with PD with small BG-PVS demonstrated an association with MDS-UPDRS Parts I (P = 0.008) and II (both P = 0.02), whereas patients with large BG-PVS demonstrated an association with MDS-UPDRS Parts III (P < 0.0001) and IV (P < 0.001). BG-PVS were not correlated with cognition. Conclusions: Small BG-PVS are associated with motor and nonmotor aspects of experiences in daily living, while large BG-PVS are associated with the motor symptoms and motor complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1304-1309
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume37
Issue number6
Early online date11 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2022

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Parkinson's disease
  • perivascular Virchow-Robin spaces
  • basal ganglia
  • white matter hyperintensities
  • ONDRI

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