Small temporal asynchronies between the two eyes in binocular reading: Crosslinguistic data and the implications for ocular prevalence

Ruomeng Zhu, Mateo Obregón, Hamutal Kreiner, Richard Shillcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated small temporal nonalignments between the two eyes’ fixations in the reading of English and Chinese. We define nine different patterns of asynchrony and report their spatial distribution across the screen of text. We interpret them in terms of their implications for ocular prevalence—prioritizing the input from one eye over the input from the other eye in higher perception/cognition, even when binocular fusion has occurred. The data are strikingly similar across the two very different orthographies. Asynchronies, in which one eye begins the fixation earlier and/or ends it later, occur most frequently in the hemifield corresponding to that eye. We propose that such small asynchronies cue higher processing to prioritize the input from that eye, during and after binocular fusion.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
Early online date27 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 May 2021

Keywords

  • Binocular reading
  • Eye-tracking
  • Ocular prevalence
  • English
  • Chinese

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