Smarter in middle age, faster in old age: A cross-lagged panel analysis of reaction time and cognitive ability over 13 years in the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study.

Ian J. Deary, Michael Allerhand, Geoff Der

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Participants in the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study per-formed reaction time tasks and took the Alice Heim 4 Part I test (AH4) of intelligence twice, 13 years apart. Cross-lagged associations between speed of processing and AH4 were examined using latent variables in structural equation modeling. The stability coefficients of the latent traits of processing speed and of AH4 score across 13 years were .49 and .89, respectively. There was a significant association (-.21) between AH4 score at age 56 and speed of processing at age 69 but not vice versa. The results fail to support the theory that processing speed is a foundation for successful cognitive aging but support a hypothesis that suggests that higher general intelligence might be associated with lifestyle and other factors that preserve processing speed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-47
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2009

Keywords

  • aging
  • intelligence
  • longitudinal study
  • processing speed
  • reaction time

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Smarter in middle age, faster in old age: A cross-lagged panel analysis of reaction time and cognitive ability over 13 years in the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this