Social media, video data and heritage language learning: Researching the transnational literacy practices of young children from immigrant families

Sumin Zhao*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract / Description of output

There are a growing number of young children around the globe whose lives now move across the boundaries between nations, languages and cultures. This new phenomenon – childhood on the move – is shaped by the interaction of two types of mobility, population and technologies (mobile phones and social media apps). The literacy practices of these typically multilingual children often transgress the traditional boundaries of time and space and take place in multiple transnational sites. This chapter is based primarily on a study of young children from Chinese immigrant backgrounds, and their heritage language and literacy learning on WeChat, a popular Chinese-language social media app. While some findings of the study will be reported, the main purpose of the chapter is to map out different aspects a researcher who wishes to research transnational literacy practices of young children or migrant children more generally may consider. The chapter examines critically the detour the researcher took during the fieldwork, and in doing so invites reflection on the nature of video-based research as well as debates about video methods in research with young children in the ‘video society’.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge International Handbook of Learning with Technology in Early Childhood
EditorsNatalia Kucirkova, Jennifer Rowsell, Garry Falloon
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter8
Pages107-126
Number of pages20
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781351389860, 9781315143040
ISBN (Print)9781138308169, 9781138308190
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Publication series

NameRoutledge International Handbooks of Education
PublisherRoutledge

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