Some observations on the Mesolithic crustacean assemblage from Ulva Cave, Inner Hebrides, Scotland.

Catriona Pickard, Clive Bonsall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Crustacean remains are a common component of Mesolithic coastal shell middens in western Scotland and, potentially, are a valuable source of information on subsistence practices and shore ecology, yet they are rarely analyzed or described in detail in the archaeological literature. This paper focuses on the crustacean assemblage from a cave site on a small island in the Inner Hebrides, and offers some preliminary observations on prey selection, activity scheduling, and methods of capture employed by Mesolithic foragers living along the Atlantic coast of Scotland. The palaeoenvironmental significance of the crustacean remains is also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnderstanding the Past
Subtitle of host publicationPapers Offered to Stefan K. Kozłowski
EditorsJan Michał Burdukiewicz, Krzysztof Cyrek, Piotr Dyczek, Karol Szymczak
Place of PublicationWarsaw
PublisherUniversity of Warsaw Center for Research on the Antiquity of Southeastern Europe
Pages305-313
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)978-83-928330-4-8
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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