Storminess in northern Italy and the Adriatic Sea reaching back to 1760

C. Matulla, M. Hofstaetter, I. Auer, R. Boehm, M. Maugeri, H. von Storch, O. Krueger*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates storminess in northern Italy and the northern Adriatic Sea through the examination of several storm proxies. These proxies are based on homogenized daily mean pressure series given at a set of stations (Genoa, Milan, Padua, Turin, and Hvar). The application of widely accepted and well-known methods on pressure series allows for a long-term year-to-year analysis of the intra-seasonal storm variability. As storminess is usually more intense throughout the cold season, our analysis is limited to the October-March period of each year. The following proxies are considered in this study: First, we assess the statistics of geostrophic wind speed. These statistics are derived from two adjacent triangles that are located across the Adriatic Sea (Padua-Hvar-Genoa) and in northern Italy (Genoa-Padua-Turin). Second, we evaluate annual statistics of time series of pressure tendency. Last, intra-seasonal low percentiles of pressure are also made use of. These proxies are used to describe the evolution of the storm climate far back in time, covering in some cases a 260-year long period. The proxies show pronounced interannual and interdecadal variability, but no sustained long-term trend. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-85
Number of pages6
JournalPhysics and Chemistry of the Earth
Volume40-41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Storminess
  • Northern Italy
  • Venetian lagoon
  • From 1760 on
  • Adriatic Sea
  • PRESSURE SERIES 1763-1998
  • DAILY MILAN TEMPERATURE
  • SCANDINAVIAN STORMINESS
  • CLIMATE SCENARIOS
  • TIME-SERIES
  • REGION
  • STORMS
  • EUROPE
  • SURGE
  • VARIABILITY

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Storminess in northern Italy and the Adriatic Sea reaching back to 1760'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this