Subjective sleep-related breathing disorders and executive function in children with intermittent or mild persistent asthma

Dimos Gidaris, Stella Stabouli, Kleio Eleftheriou, Dimitrios Cassimos, Donald Urquhart, Vasilios Kotsis, Dimitrios Zafeiriou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective
The impact on executive function performance of sleep-related disorders in asthmatic children has been scarcely studied in community settings. The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) in children with intermittent or mild persistent asthma in primary care settings, and to examine the possible correlations with measures of executive function.

Methods
We performed a case–control study including 76 children with asthma (intermittent or mild persistent) and 85 healthy controls. The parents of both patients and controls completed the Paediatric Seep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) questionnaire.

Results
We did not find any statistically significant differences regarding the scales of PSQ. Additionally, there were no statistical differences between asthmatic children and controls regarding the scales of the BRIEF questionnaire. In both asthmatic children and controls the score of the scale of obstructive sleep-related breathing disorder was significantly correlated with the T scores of the two composite scales (BRI and MI) and the Global Executive Composite.

Conclusion
In children with intermittent or mild persistent asthma under the care of private general paediatricians there were no statistically significant differences regarding subjective SBD compared to the healthy controls. Also there were no statistical differences between asthmatic children and controls regarding behavioural correlates of executive function during everyday life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-799
Number of pages6
JournalThe Clinical Respiratory Journal
Volume15
Issue number7
Early online date22 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2021

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