Successful use of national cancer registry data to monitor the effective use of imatinib for treating chronic myeloid leukaemia

P. Shepherd, C. Dhanapala, C. Maguire, J. White, M. Drummond, T. Holyoake, P. R. E. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which selectively antagonises the BCR-ABL molecular pathway which causes chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Imatinib was first approved by the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) in January 2002 with the recommendation that its use be audited. The cost of the drug has major financial implications for health resources.

Methods

All imatinib usage since its first prescription in Scotland in September 2000 to July 2003 was audited through pharmacy records and through the Scotland Leukaemia Registry (SLR). an existing national registry of patients with CML.

Results

One hundred and four patients in Chronic Phase (CP), 36 in Accelerated Phase (AP) and five in Blast Phase (BP) received imatinib The median duration of therapy was not reached for CP, 17 months for AP and two months for BP patients. Major (complete) cytogenetic response rates were 74% (63%) and 38% (24%) respectively for CP and AP Overall survival for all CP patients from the start of imatinib therapy was 94% at one year. 91% at two years and 83% at three years An audit of the effectiveness of the SLR as an auditing agency, showed complete registration in 95% of cases.

Conclusions

We believe such data collection should be an important ongoing resource for assessing outcomes in 2 rare form of leukaemia but one which already has major implications for health economics and will continue to do so given the future development of dual tyrosine kinase inhibitors for imatinib resistant cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-12
Number of pages5
JournalScottish Medical Journal
Volume53
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

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