Supporting Social Innovation in Children: Developing a Game to Promote Health Eating

Nora Ptakauskaite, Priscilla Chueng-Nainby, Helen Pain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract / Description of output

Two things often observed in children: (1) many do not eat a healthy diet and (2) they like playing video-games. Game-based learning has proven to be an effective method for attitude change, and thus has the potential to influence children's eating habits. This study looks at how, through a series of workshop activities, children themselves can inform the design of such games. Using a co-constructive approach, the study's format promotes creativity and control, enabling children to act as valuable informants for its design. Patterns emerging from the study show that children do indeed understand the concept of healthy eating. Future phases of this work will explore whether they understand how various foods affect their bodies. This information will then inform the design of a video-game that encourages healthy eating.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the The 15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, USA
PublisherACM
Pages688-693
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-4313-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jun 2016
Event15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children - Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 21 Jun 201624 Jun 2016

Publication series

NameIDC '16
PublisherACM

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Abbreviated titleIDC'16
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period21/06/1624/06/16

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