Survival of the fattest: Evolutionary trade-offs in cellular resource storage

Guillaume Terradot, Andrea Beica, Andrea Weisse, Vincent Danos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cells derive resources from their environments and use them to fuel the biosynthetic processes that determine cell growth. Depending on how responsive the biosynthetic processes are to the availability of intracellular resources, cells can build up different levels of resource storage. Here we use a recent mathematical model of the coarse-grained mechanisms that drive cellular growth to investigate the effects of cellular resource storage on growth. We show that, on the one hand, there is a cost associated with high levels of storage resulting from the loss of stored resources due to dilution. We further show that, on the other hand, high levels of storage can benefit cells in variable environments by increasing biomass production during transitions from one medium to another. Our results thus suggest that cells may face trade-os in their maintenance of resource storage based on the frequency of environmental change.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationElectronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science
Subtitle of host publication7th International Workshop on Static Analysis and Systems Biology (SASB 2016)
Pages91-112
Number of pages22
Volume335
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2018
EventThe Seventh International Workshop on Static Analysis and Systems Biology - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 7 Sep 20167 Sep 2016
http://sasb2016.fi.muni.cz/

Publication series

NameElectronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science
PublisherElseveir
Volume335
ISSN (Print)1571-0661

Conference

ConferenceThe Seventh International Workshop on Static Analysis and Systems Biology
Abbreviated titleSASB 2016
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period7/09/167/09/16
Internet address

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