Tetraploid cells from cytokinesis failure induce aneuploidy and spontaneous transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells

Lei Lv, Tianwei Zhang, Qiyi Yi, Yun Huang, Zheng Wang, Heli Hou, Huan Zhang, Wei Zheng, Qiaomei Hao, Zongyou Guo, Howard J Cooke, Qinghua Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Most ovarian cancers originate from the ovarian surface epithelium and are characterized by aneuploid karyotypes. Aneuploidy, a consequence of chromosome instability, is an early event during the development of ovarian cancers. However, how aneuploid cells are evolved from normal diploid cells in ovarian cancers remains unknown. In the present study, cytogenetic analyses of a mouse syngeneic ovarian cancer model revealed that diploid mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells (MOSECs) experienced an intermediate tetraploid cell stage, before evolving to aneuploid (mainly near-tetraploid) cells. Using long-term live-cell imaging followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrated that tetraploid cells originally arose from cytokinesis failure of bipolar mitosis in diploid cells, and gave rise to aneuploid cells through chromosome mis-segregation during both bipolar and multipolar mitoses. Injection of the late passage aneuploid MOSECs resulted in tumor formation in C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, we reveal a pathway for the evolution of diploid to aneuploid MOSECs and elucidate a mechanism for the development of near-tetraploid ovarian cancer cells.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2864-75
Number of pages12
JournalCell Cycle
Volume11
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2012

Keywords

  • Aneuploidy
  • Animals
  • Cell Line
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
  • Chromosome Segregation
  • Cytokinesis
  • Epithelial Cells
  • Female
  • In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mitosis
  • Ovarian Neoplasms
  • Ovary
  • Tetraploidy

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