The association of regular exercise with violence related behaviors in urban adolescents

Noe D. Romo , Melissa DuPont-Reyes, Deborah Fry, Melissa S. Stockwell, Leslie L. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Objective: Is regular exercise in urban adolescents associated with decreased violence related behaviors. Methods: Cross-sectional secondary analysis of a New York City public high school survey. The exercise exposure variables identified were: Exercise frequency, # sit-ups, longest run, playing on a sports team. The violence related behavior outcome variables were: Not carrying a weapon, not being in a physical fight, not being in a gang. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate odds ratios between primary exposure and outcome variables. Results: Females reporting higher exercise frequency had increased odds of not being in gang (2.9[1.6-5.2]). Females doing >20 sit-ups had increased odds of not carrying weapon (2.6[1.4-4.8]) and of not being in gang (2.5[1.4-4.6]). Females reporting running >20 minutes had increased odds of not carrying weapon (2.4[1.2-4.9]) and of not being in gang (2.3[1.2-4.6]). Females reporting being on a team had increased odds of not carrying weapon (2.0[1.1-3.6]), not being in fight (1.95[1.4-2.7]) and not being in gang (2.6[1.5-4.4]). Males reporting being on a team and higher exercise frequency had increased odds of not being in a fight (1.7[1.2-2.4]) and (1.5[1.1-2.0]). Conclusions: Higher exercise frequency and intensity was associated with decreased violence related behaviors in females and only protective against fighting in males.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
JournalAnnals of Public Health and Research
Volume4
Issue number1
Early online date16 Jun 2017
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Jun 2017

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • violence
  • exercise
  • adolesccents
  • behavior

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The association of regular exercise with violence related behaviors in urban adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this