The association of viral infection and chronic allograft nephropathy with graft dysfunction following renal transplantation

C. Y. William Tong, Ali Bakran, J. S. Malik Peiris, Peter Muir, C Simon Herrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. The long-term effect of viral infections on graft dysfunction and rejection after renal transplantation is uncertain.

Methods. A cohort of 37 renal transplant recipients was followed prospectively for 3 years. Creatinine clearance rate at 6 months and 3 years and chronic allograft nephropathy were correlated with the detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 and BK virus DNA, CMV disease, and acute rejection.

Results. CMV disease was significantly associated with poor graft function at 6 months, whereas chronic allograft nephropathy was associated with graft dysfunction at 3 years. Both CMV disease and detection of human herpesvirus 6 DNA were associated with chronic allograft nephropathy.

Conclusions. CMV disease was a significant cause of early graft dysfunction, whereas the presence of chronic allograft nephropathy was the main determinant of poor long-term graft function. The role of viral infections in chronic allograft nephropathy deserves further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)576-578
JournalTransplantation
Volume74
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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