The cardiovascular effects of air pollution: Prevention and reversal by pharmacological agents

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Air pollution is associated with staggering levels of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Airborne particulate matter (PM), in particular, has been associated with a wide range of detrimental cardiovascular effects, including impaired vascular function, raised blood pressure, alterations in cardiac rhythm, blood clotting disorders, coronary artery disease, and stroke. Considerable headway has been made in elucidating the biological processes underlying these associations, revealing a labyrinth of multiple interacting mechanistic pathways. Several studies have used pharmacological agents to prevent or reverse the cardiovascular effects of PM; an approach that not only has the advantages of elucidating mechanisms, but also potentially revealing therapeutic agents that could benefit individuals that are especially susceptible to the effects of air pollution. This review gathers investigations with pharmacological agents, offering insight into the biology of how PM, and other air pollutants, may cause cardiovascular morbidity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107996
JournalPharmacology and Therapeutics
Early online date25 Sep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Sep 2021

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