The chicken left right organizer has nonmotile cilia which are lost in a stage-dependent manner in the talpid3 ciliopathy

Louise A. Stephen, Edward J. Johnson, Gemma M. Davis, Lynn Mcteir, Jamie Pinkham, Neema Jaberi, Megan G. Davey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Motile cilia are an essential component of the mouse, zebrafish, and Xenopus laevis Left Right Organizers, generating nodal flow and allowing the reception and transduction of mechanosensory signals. Nonmotile primary cilia are also an important component of the Left Right Organizer's chemosensory mechanism. It has been proposed in the chicken that signaling in Hensen's node, the Left Right Organizer of the chicken, is independent of cilia, based on a lack of evidence of motile cilia or nodal flow. It is speculated that the talpid3 chicken mutant, which has normal left–right patterning despite lacking cilia at many stages of development, is proof of this hypothesis. Here, we examine the evidence for cilia in Hensen's node and find that although cilia are present; they are likely to be immotile and incapable of generating nodal flow. Furthermore, we find that early planar cell polarity patterning and ciliogenesis is normal in early talpid3 chicken embryos. We conclude that patterning and development of the early talpid3 chicken is normal, but not necessarily independent of cilia. Although it appears that Hensen's node does not require motile cilia or the generation of motile flow, there may remain a requirement for cilia in the transduction of SHH signaling. genesis 00:1–14. © 2014 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)600-613
JournalGenesis
Volume52
Issue number6
Early online date2 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2014

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