The development and evaluation of a nurse led food intolerance clinic in primary care

Jane Ogden (Lead Author), J Pope, Mia Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective
To develop a clinic for patients who believe they have a food intolerance that could be administered by practice nurses with minimal experience of dietary change or food intolerance.

Methods
The clinic consisted of 1 week baseline, 2 weeks healthy eating plan (HE), 2 weeks wheat and dairy free plan (WD). Patients were discharged after the HE plan if their symptoms had improved, otherwise they continued onto the WD plan. Following training 4 nurses ran 4 clinics across the UK.

Results
281 patients with perceived food intolerance were recruited. The most common symptoms were bowel symptoms, tiredness, stomach symptoms, and headaches. Of those who completed the programme (n = 150), the majority were discharged after the HE plan as their symptoms had improved (n = 106, 70.6%). A third also completed the WD plan (n = 44, 29%). Symptoms, mood and quality of life improved significantly by the end of the intervention. WD showed added value as symptoms showed further improvement.

Conclusion
There was a need for the clinic although not on a full time basis. Symptoms improved following both the HE and WD plans.
Practice implications

A simple dietary based intervention may help relieve symptoms in those who believe they have a food intolerance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1-e5
Number of pages5
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • Food Intolerance
  • Nurse Intervention
  • Dietary Change
  • Patient Education

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The development and evaluation of a nurse led food intolerance clinic in primary care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this