The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae

Darren J Obbard, Deborah M Callister, Francis M Jiggins, Dinesh C Soares, Guiyun Yan, Tom J Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Host-parasite coevolution can result in balancing selection, which maintains genetic variation in the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. It has been suggested that variation in a thioester-containing protein called TEP1 (AGAP010815) may alter the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit Plasmodium parasites, and high divergence between alleles of this gene suggests the possible action of long-term balancing selection. We studied whether TEP1 is a case of an ancient balanced polymorphism in an animal immune system.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume8
Issue number274
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Alleles
  • Animals
  • Anopheles gambiae
  • DNA
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • Gene Conversion
  • Genes, Insect
  • Insect Proteins
  • Models, Genetic
  • Polymorphism, Genetic
  • Selection, Genetic
  • Sequence Alignment
  • Sequence Analysis, DNA

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