The faith community and mental health resilience amongst Australian Ismaili Muslim youth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The religio-cultural community of minority ethnic migrants can strongly affect post-migration adaptation. Whilst religion itself may influence resilience, the social support network it provides may also play a role. Extant literature on resilience and migrant communities has largely focused on refugees whilst the experience of younger voluntary migrants and second-generation immigrants, who may experience “acculturative stress”, has been overlooked. This study examines 18-25 year old diasporic and post-diasporic Ismaili Muslim youth in Australia. Of the 11 youth respondents, five were Australian-born/raised and six were recent immigrants. Five community leaders were also interviewed for triangulation. Respondents were obtained using purposive and convenience sampling in two Australian cities. Results demonstrate how faith engagement and civic participation were utilised in developing resilience when facing mental health stressors encountered during the migratory and acculturative processes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-207
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Mar 2016

Keywords

  • Resilience
  • mental health
  • Australia
  • Muslim
  • Religion
  • South Asian
  • Immigrant

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