The gut microbiome but not the resistome is associated with urogenital schistosomiasis in preschool-aged children

Derick Osakunor, Patrick Munk, Takafira Mduluza, Thomas N. Petersen, Christian Brinch, Alasdair Ivens, Theresa Chimponda, Seth Amanfo, Janice Murray, Mark Woolhouse, Frank M. Aarestrup, Francisca Mutapi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Helminth parasites have been shown to have systemic effects in the host. Using shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we characterise the gut microbiome and resistome of 113 Zimbabwean preschool-aged children (1–5 years). We test the hypothesis that infection with the human helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium, is associated with changes in gut microbial and antimicrobial resistance gene abundance/diversity. Here, we show that bacteria phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and fungi phyla Ascomycota, Microsporidia, Zoopagomycota dominate the microbiome. The abundance of Proteobacteria, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota differ between schistosome infected versus uninfected children. Specifically, infection is associated with increases in Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Derxia, Thalassospira, Aspergillus, Tricholoma, and Periglandula, with a decrease in Azospirillum. We find 262 AMR genes, from 12 functional drug classes, but no association with individual-specific data. To our knowledge, we describe a novel metagenomic dataset of Zimbabwean preschool-aged children, indicating an association between urogenital schistosome infection and changes in the gut microbiome.
Original languageEnglish
Article number155
JournalNature
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The gut microbiome but not the resistome is associated with urogenital schistosomiasis in preschool-aged children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this