The Hathoric model of queenship in early Ptolemaic Egypt: The case of Berenike’s lock

Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, Stephanie Winder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

This chapter looks at queen Berenike II of Egypt and in particular her dedication at the temple of Arsinoe II at Cape Zephyrion in connection with her husband Ptolemy III Euergetes’ successful return from the Third Syrian War (246–241BCE). This dedication had been commemorated by Callimachus in his Lock of Berenice. On the basis of a full study of the political events of her lifetime and of representation in iconography, Llewellyn and Winder argue that Berenike set out to project herself as an equivalent of the Egyptian goddess Hathor. The role Berenike played in relation to her husband could thus be represented as analogous to Hathor’s role in relation to Horus, partly that of lover and partly that of protector.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGreco-Egyptian Interactions
Subtitle of host publicationLiterature, Translation, and Culture, 500 BC–AD 300
EditorsIan Rutherford
PublisherOxford University Press
Chapter6
Pages139-162
ISBN (Print)9780199656127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Feb 2016

Keywords

  • Hathor
  • Ptolemy
  • Berenike
  • queenship
  • imagery
  • hair

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