The immobility of pectic substances in injured tomato leaves and its bearing on the identity of the wound hormone

E. A.H. Baydoun, S. C. Fry*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It has been suggested that pectic polysaccharides (or oligosaccharides cleaved from them) are liberated from the cell wall upon wounding of leaf tissue, and that they act as long-distance hormones evoking a defence response in neighbouring uninjured leaves (P.D. bishop et al. 1981, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 3536-3540, and cited literature). We have tested this hypothesis by infiltration of radioactive pectic fragments (rhamnogalacturonans and homogalacturonans of degrec of polymerisation down to 6) into wounds on tomato leaves. No radioactivity was exported from the treated leaf. [14C]Sucrose, applied in the same way, was effectively translocated, probably via the phloem. We suggest that pectic substances are not themselves long-distance wound hormones. The possibility remains that pectic substances, solubilised on wounding, act in the immediate vicinity of the wound to stimulate the dispatch of a second messenger, which would be the long-distance wound hormone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-276
Number of pages8
JournalPlanta
Volume165
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 1985

Keywords

  • lycopersicon (wound hormone)
  • pectic oligosaccharide
  • proteinase inhibitor inducing factor
  • wound hormone

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