The Impact of Bullying Perpetration and Victimization on Later Violence and Psychological Distress: A Study of Resilience amongst a Scottish Youth Cohort

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Abstract

This article examines the impact of bullying between age 13 and 16 years on negative outcomes at age 17 years, taking into account various resilience factors at the individual, family and community level. Using longitudinal data from the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime, a prospective cohort study of around 4,300 young people in Scotland, the impact of bullying perpetration on later engagement in violence and the impact of bullying victimization on later psychological distress are modeled. The analysis finds significant resilience factors, which reduce violence and psychological distress in late adolescence; however, even when controlling for such factors, both bullying perpetration and bullying victimization are strongly predictive of later negative outcomes. The findings support policy responses that implement
early and effective interventions within schools to both prevent bullying and improve individual resilience to its long-term effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-39
JournalJournal of School Violence
Volume13
Issue number1
Early online date20 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • bullying
  • victimisation
  • resilience
  • adolescence
  • Scotland
  • longitudinal
  • Edinburgh Study
  • ESYTC

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