The interstitial cells of Cajal of the equine gastrointestinal tract: what we know so far

C Fintl, N P H Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gastrointestinal motility disorders are a serious problem in both veterinary and human medicine and may represent a dysfunction of the neural, muscular or pacemaker components (interstitial cells of Cajal) of bowel control. The interstitial cells of Cajal are considered to be the pacemakers and mediators of certain forms of neurotransmission in the gastrointestinal tract. These cells have been implicated, either primarily or secondarily, in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease processes in which there is a prominent element of disturbance to intestinal motility. In the horse, their involvement has been implicated in large intestinal obstructive colic and grass sickness (equine dysautonomia). This review highlights the properties of the interstitial cells of Cajal and the role these cells play in orchestrating gastrointestinal motility patterns. In addition, it examines their role in intestinal motility disorders and summarises our current understanding of their importance in the equine gastrointestinal tract.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)372-7
Number of pages6
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

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