The island rule of body size demonstrated on individual hosts: phytophagous click beetle species grow larger and predators smaller on phylogenetically isolated trees

Freerk Molleman, Alexandre Depoilly, Philippe Vernon, Jörg Müller, Richard Bailey, Andrea Jarzabek-Müller, Andreas Prinzing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

nder spatial isolation on oceanic islands, species tend to show extreme body sizes. From the point of view of many colonizers, individual hosts surrounded by phylogenetically distant neighbours are phylogenetically isolated. This study addresses for the first time how phylogenetic isolation of individual hosts affects body size of colonizers, and whether effects on body size reflect selection among colonizers established on host individuals rather than selection among colonizers dispersing toward trees or phenotypic plasticity of colonizers.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of biogeography
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2016

Keywords

  • community ecology
  • dispersal selection
  • Elateridae forest
  • island biogeography
  • local adaptation
  • microevolution
  • phenotypic plasticity
  • plant-animal interactions,
  • vegetation diversity

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